Alternating regimes of motion in cell motility models

Cellular movement is a complex dynamic process, resulting from the interaction of multiple elements at the intra and extra-cellular levels. This epiphenomenon presents a variety of behaviors, which can include normal and anomalous diffusion or collective migration. In some cases cells can get neighb...

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Detalles Bibliográficos
Autores principales: Guisoni, Nara, Mazzitello, Karina I., Diambra, Luis Aníbal
Formato: Articulo Preprint
Lenguaje:Inglés
Publicado: 2020
Materias:
Acceso en línea:http://sedici.unlp.edu.ar/handle/10915/124989
Aporte de:SEDICI (UNLP) de Universidad Nacional de La Plata Ver origen
Descripción
Sumario:Cellular movement is a complex dynamic process, resulting from the interaction of multiple elements at the intra and extra-cellular levels. This epiphenomenon presents a variety of behaviors, which can include normal and anomalous diffusion or collective migration. In some cases cells can get neighborhood information through chemical or mechanical cues. A unified understanding about how such information can influence the dynamics of cell movement is still lacking. In order to improve our comprehension of cell migration we consider a cellular Potts model where cells move actively in the direction of a driving field. The intensity of this driving field is constant, while its orientation can evolves according to two alternative dynamics based on the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. In the first case, the next orientation of the driving field depends on the previous direction of the field. In the second case, the direction update considers the mean orientation performed by the cell in previous steps. Thus, the latter update rule mimics the ability of cells to perceive the environment, avoiding obstacles and thus increasing the cellular displacement. Our results indicate that both dynamics introduce temporal and spatial correlations in cell velocity in a friction coefficient and cell density dependent manner. Furthermore, we observe alternating regimes in the mean square displacement, with normal and anomalous diffusion. The crossovers between superdiffusive and diffusive regimes, are strongly affected by both the driving field dynamics and cell-cell interactions. In this sense, when cell polarization update grants information about the previous cellular displacement decreases the duration of the diffusive regime, in particular for high density cultures.