Following the footprints of variability during filopodia growth

Filopodia are actin-built finger-like dynamic structures that protrude from the cell cortex. These structures can sense the environment and play key roles in migration and cell-cell interactions. The growth-retraction cycle of filopodia is a complex process exquisitely regulated by intra- and extra-...

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Detalles Bibliográficos
Autores principales: Senra, Daniela, Páez, Alejandra, Gueron, Geraldine, Bruno, Luciana, Guisoni, Nara Cristina
Formato: Articulo Preprint
Lenguaje:Inglés
Publicado: 2020
Materias:
Acceso en línea:http://sedici.unlp.edu.ar/handle/10915/124842
Aporte de:SEDICI (UNLP) de Universidad Nacional de La Plata Ver origen
Descripción
Sumario:Filopodia are actin-built finger-like dynamic structures that protrude from the cell cortex. These structures can sense the environment and play key roles in migration and cell-cell interactions. The growth-retraction cycle of filopodia is a complex process exquisitely regulated by intra- and extra-cellular cues, whose nature remains elusive. Filopodia present wide variation in length, lifetime and growth rate. Here, we investigate the features of filopodia patterns in fixed prostate cancer cells by confocal microscopy. Analysis of almost a thousand filopodia suggests the presence of two different populations: one characterized by a narrow distribution of lengths and the other with a much more variable pattern with very long filopodia. We explore a stochastic model of filopodia growth which takes into account diffusion and reactions involving actin and the regulatory proteins formin and capping, and retrograde flow. Interestingly, we found an inverse dependence between the filopodial length and the retrograde velocity. This result led us to propose that variations in the retrograde velocity could explain the experimental lengths observed for these tumor cells. In this sense, one population involves a wider range of retrograde velocities than the other population, and also includes low values of this velocity. It has been hypothesized that cells would be able to regulate retrograde flow as a mechanism to control filopodia length. Thus, we propound that the experimental filopodia pattern is the result of differential retrograde velocities originated from heterogeneous signaling due to cell-substrate interactions or prior cell-cell contacts.