Political Culture in Mexico City: street lamp, dusk at home

The issue of political culture is part of the new trends in contemporary political science. Most of its studies are based on an inevitable reference: The Civic Culture by Gabriel Almond and Sidney Verba. The concept of political culture is understood by the assimilation of a set of values, images, s...

Descripción completa

Detalles Bibliográficos
Autores principales: Larruz Jiménez, Georgina; Facultad de Ciencias Políticas y Sociales, UNAM, Durán Lule, Anayeli; Facultad de Ciencias Políticas y Sociales, UNAM
Lenguaje:Español
Publicado: Facultad de Ciencias Políticas y Sociales 2013
Materias:
Acceso en línea:http://www.revistas.unam.mx/index.php/rmop/article/view/41765
http://biblioteca.clacso.edu.ar/gsdl/cgi-bin/library.cgi?a=d&c=mx/mx-047&d=article41765oai
Aporte de:Red de Bibliotecas Virtuales de Ciencias Sociales (CLACSO) de Consejo Latinoamericano de Ciencias Sociales Ver origen
Descripción
Sumario:The issue of political culture is part of the new trends in contemporary political science. Most of its studies are based on an inevitable reference: The Civic Culture by Gabriel Almond and Sidney Verba. The concept of political culture is understood by the assimilation of a set of values, images, symbols, and the way individuals perceive the political system, evaluate their roles and relationships with key stakeholders.Thus, participation is made according to these patterns of behavior between rulers and ruled. Mexico City, a political entity different from the rest of others, boasts the highest levels of national involvement. However, this figure turns out to be misleading because in their local government participation levels are extremely low. This entity’s participation mechanisms are institutionalized in various frameworks, but in practice they have proved a failure. This article will explain the reasons for this involvement is in sharp contrast with the numbers displayed in federal elections.