Church, Conflict and Power: Keys to a Culture of Dialogue, Reconciliation and Peace in Nicaragua

Nicaragua has a history of social conflict, where violence, at its various levels and manifestations, has been the way to resolve all forms of conflict in the pursuit of social peace. The constant search for the conquest of political power, almost always dominated by the economic interests of the ru...

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Detalles Bibliográficos
Autor principal: Gómez, Guillermo
Formato: Artículo revista
Lenguaje:Español
Publicado: Maestría en Estudios Latinoamericanos, Facultad de Ciencias Políticas y Sociales, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo 2019
Materias:
Acceso en línea:https://revistas.uncu.edu.ar/ojs3/index.php/mel/article/view/2470
Aporte de:A de Universidad Nacional de Cuyo Ver origen
Descripción
Sumario:Nicaragua has a history of social conflict, where violence, at its various levels and manifestations, has been the way to resolve all forms of conflict in the pursuit of social peace. The constant search for the conquest of political power, almost always dominated by the economic interests of the ruling classes; the quarterly defense of national sovereignty, resisting any interference form, has meant hard armed confrontations to Nicaragua; as the popular insurrection of the 70s against the dictatorship of Anastasio Somoza, which culminated in the triumph of the Sandinista Popular Revolution in 1979. On April 18, 2018, Nicaragua faced a new socio-political conflict, which took the form of a Coup d'etat, without results for the sectors of the opposition to the Sandinista Government. The destabilizing action was organized by dissident groups of right-wing parties, colluded with leaders agglutinated under the Sandinista Renovation Movement (MRS), and Nicaraguan businessmen, organized in the dome of the Higher Council of Private Enterprise (COSEP), owners of large capital. All of them, opponents of the Government of Reconciliation and National Unity, who returned to power in the November 2007 elections. The purpose of this Article is to describe and interpret, from the Social Doctrine of the Church and from the Philosophy for Peace, the role played by the Episcopal Conference of Nicaragua as guarantor of the National Dialogue table, convened by Commander Daniel Ortega; whose main actors were representatives of the Government of Nicaragua and the Civic Alliance for Justice and Democracy.