All the better to read you: new perspectives on the figure of the Big Bad Wolf

One of the most famous fairy tales is "Little Red Riding Hood", a story created by Charles Perrault and later recreated by the Grimm brothers. The story refers to the dangerous attraction from the external world and it presents an omnipresent character in children's literature: the bi...

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Detalles Bibliográficos
Autor principal: Mangione Cárdenas, Noelia
Formato: Artículo revista
Lenguaje:Español
Publicado: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo 2018
Materias:
Acceso en línea:https://revistas.uncu.edu.ar/ojs3/index.php/boletingec/article/view/1299
Aporte de:B de Universidad Nacional de Cuyo Ver origen
Descripción
Sumario:One of the most famous fairy tales is "Little Red Riding Hood", a story created by Charles Perrault and later recreated by the Grimm brothers. The story refers to the dangerous attraction from the external world and it presents an omnipresent character in children's literature: the big bad wolf. This figure symbolizes all the asocial and primitive forces of human beings. The following paper analyzes the symbolic construction of this character and dialogue that engage with Perrault’s classic five works of contemporary children's literature: "The Big Bad Wolf and the Brave Hunter" by Ana María Machado, "The Wolves in the Walls" by Neil Gaiman, "Little Red Riding Hood and the Wolf" by Roald Dahl, Red Wolf and fierce littlehood by Elsa Bornemann and "I, the Wolf and the chocolate chip cookie" by Delphine Perret. Throughout these stories, the resignification of the fearsome big bad wolf is examinated by means of different humorous mechanisms.