Diversidad faunística y potenciales agentes tafonómicos en el Chaco árido (Córdoba, Argentina): Una aproximación preliminar con cámaras trampa

The aim of this study was to identify the main animal species that act on carcasses of large ungulates and their potential as taphonomic agents in an area near the southern end of the Salinas Grandes de Córdoba. To this end, three camera-trap surveys were conducted on Bos taurus and Lama guanicoe ca...

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Detalles Bibliográficos
Autores principales: IDACOR, Weihmüller, María Paula, Costa, Thiago, Castro, Lucila B., Barri, Fernando R.
Formato: Artículo publishedVersion
Publicado: Universidad del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires 2021
Materias:
Acceso en línea:https://suquia.ffyh.unc.edu.ar/handle/suquia/18010
Aporte de:Suquía - Instituto de Antropología de Córdoba (IDACOR, CONICET y UNC) de Universidad Nacional de Córdoba Ver origen
Descripción
Sumario:The aim of this study was to identify the main animal species that act on carcasses of large ungulates and their potential as taphonomic agents in an area near the southern end of the Salinas Grandes de Córdoba. To this end, three camera-trap surveys were conducted on Bos taurus and Lama guanicoe carcasses, covering 194 trap days between November 2017 and May 2019. In addition, preliminary observations were made of the disarticulation, dispersal, and traces generated by different taphonomic agents acting on the carcasses in order to contribute to the understanding of the natural formation processes of zooarchaeological assemblages in the region. The monitoring recorded 5869 animals and identified 30 species. The data suggested that modifications observed on carcasses in the region may have been produced by a variety of animals that exceeds those usually considered in zooarchaeological studies. The species with the greatest potential to generate taphonomic modifications were the native mammal, L. griseus, and two introduced mammals, S. scrofa and C. lupus familiaris. The activity of L. griseus is notable for having been recorded both in the early stages of decomposition and on a skeletonized carcass. S. scrofa and C. lupus familiaris activity occurred in the immediate post-mortem stages and was mainly responsible for bone dispersal and destruction. Among birds, accipitriformes and falconiformes were recorded consuming the carcasses, but their potential to generate detectable traces in the archaeological record is uncertain. Finally, trampling by large ungulates was recorded.