Holocene (~4.5-1.7 cal. kyr BP) paleoenvironmental conditions in central Argentina inferred from entire-shell and intra-shell stable isotope composition of terrestrial gastropods

The isotopic fingerprint of terrestrial gastropods has been increasingly used as a credible natural paleoenvironmental archive. Most published work has used this proxy at tropical and temperate latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, and focused on entire-shell analysis. The present study provides ent...

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Detalles Bibliográficos
Autores principales: IDACOR, Yanes, Yurena, Cattáneo, Roxana, Izeta, Andrés D., Gordillo, Sandra, Costa, Thiago
Formato: Artículo publishedVersion
Publicado: SAGE 2014
Materias:
Acceso en línea:https://suquia.ffyh.unc.edu.ar/handle/suquia/18006
Aporte de:Suquía - Instituto de Antropología de Córdoba (IDACOR, CONICET y UNC) de Universidad Nacional de Córdoba Ver origen
Descripción
Sumario:The isotopic fingerprint of terrestrial gastropods has been increasingly used as a credible natural paleoenvironmental archive. Most published work has used this proxy at tropical and temperate latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, and focused on entire-shell analysis. The present study provides entire-shell and intra-shell isotopic profiles to infer average and seasonal late Holocene environmental conditions in central Argentina (30°S). Shells of Plagiodontes daedaleus (Gastropoda: Odontostomidae) were retrieved from the Alero Deodoro Roca–Sector B site, one of the few archaeological sites in central Argentina rich in shells collected by pre-Hispanic hunter-gatherer groups. Ancient entire shells exhibited values that were ~2.5‰ higher in δ13C and ~1.8‰ higher in δ18O than modern individuals, pointing to higher abundance of C4 plants and overall drier conditions (lower relative humidity and/or higher rain δ18O) during 4.5–1.7 cal. kyr BP than today, in agreement with published regional proxies. Intra-shell isotopic profiles suggest that modern and fossil specimens deposited their shells throughout two-to-three summer/winter cycles. Intra-shell δ18O values varied ~5‰, matching with the seasonal variation of rain δ18O values. The extent of seasonality was similar during 4.5–1.7 cal. kyr BP and today. Intra-shell δ13C values varied ~2–3‰ and did not portray distinct seasonal cycles, depicting minimal seasonal variations in the snail diet. This work illustrates that South American terrestrial gastropods have great potential for paleoenvironmental studies.