The Association between Distress Tolerance and Alcohol Outcomes via Internal Drinking Motives

Introduction. Previous work suggests that college students who perceive themselves as less able to tolerate negative affect are more motivated to use alcohol to alleviate psychological distress. Recent findings also indicate that distress tolerance influences alcohol outcomes via a positive reinforc...

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Detalles Bibliográficos
Autores principales: Pilatti, Angelina, Michelini, Yanina Noelia, Bravo, Adrian J., Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos
Formato: Artículo publishedVersion
Lenguaje:Inglés
Publicado: Taylor & Francis 2022
Materias:
Acceso en línea:https://rdu.unc.edu.ar/handle/11336/156133
https://doi.org/10.1080/10826084.2021.2002900
Aporte de:Repositorio Digital Universitario (UNC) de Universidad Nacional de Córdoba Ver origen
Descripción
Sumario:Introduction. Previous work suggests that college students who perceive themselves as less able to tolerate negative affect are more motivated to use alcohol to alleviate psychological distress. Recent findings also indicate that distress tolerance influences alcohol outcomes via a positive reinforcement pathway. However, results concerning the association between distress tolerance and alcohol outcomes remain inconsistent. Aim. The present study examined the association between distinctive features of distress tolerance and alcohol outcomes via internal drinking motives (i.e., coping and enhancement) in Argentinean college students. Method. From April to November 2019, a sample of 387 college students with last-month alcohol use (Mean age = 21.09±4.98) completed an online survey assessing alcohol outcomes (past-month frequency of binge drinking and negative alcohol-related consequences), internal drinking motives, and four components of distress tolerance (i.e., tolerance, appraisal, absorption, and regulation). Results. The associations between specific facets of distress tolerance and drinking outcomes were atemporally mediated by coping and enhancement motives. Coping motives significantly mediated the effect of absorption and appraisal on alcohol-related problems (i.e., lower absorption and lower appraisal were associated with more problems via higher coping motives). Enhancement motives significantly mediated the effect of absorption (lower absorption was associated with greater enhancement motives) on binge drinking frequency and alcohol-related problems. Conclusions. Distress tolerance was associated with alcohol outcomes via coping and enhancement motives in this sample of Argentinean undergraduates. The abilities to withstand negative affect could be a focal point of interventions to prevent the development of maladaptive patterns of drinking.