The combinatoriality of language

In this article we present a brief overview of the main topics that we have worked on over the last six years with the research team that we lead together with Dra. P. Supisiche. To do so, we review the conceptual framework that articulates the different approaches and we will develop, by way of exa...

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Detalles Bibliográficos
Autor principal: Defagó, Cecilia
Formato: Artículo revista
Lenguaje:Español
Publicado: Centro de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Filosofía y Humanidades 2020
Materias:
Acceso en línea:https://revistas.unc.edu.ar/index.php/recial/article/view/31273
Aporte de:R de Universidad Nacional de Córdoba Ver origen
Descripción
Sumario:In this article we present a brief overview of the main topics that we have worked on over the last six years with the research team that we lead together with Dra. P. Supisiche. To do so, we review the conceptual framework that articulates the different approaches and we will develop, by way of example, some of the results achieved. Some of the problems worked on served as a basis of final works and undergraduate and postgraduate thesis, as well as various publications and academic productions.The investigations were carried out with the support of the SECyT UNC, within the framework of three Research Projects, two of which (the first and the last) were part of respective Research Programs, where we work together with teams from different academic units of the UNC (Faculty of Philosophy and Humanities, of Languages, of Psychology and FAMAF of the UNC).The plurality of views on the same object allowed us to identify what is essential in the processing of language, recognizing those properties that, paraphrasing J. Searle (1994), are constitutive, distinguishing them from those that are regulative of its use. The possibility of unlimited production of linguistic messages from limited resources and the fact that linguistic statements are independent of their contexts of production, is due to the fact that the meaning of the whole (the message) is the product of the combination of the parts. Hence, our research focused on the analysis of the combinatorial characteristics of languages. Although these occur at all descriptive levels of languages, we focus particularly on the sentence and syntagmatic level, because is where processes of different nature are articulated and integrated. In particular we work with the syntactic and semantic combinatorics that occur at the sentence level, that we analice from different linguistic phenomena and theoretical perspectives. We consider that the results achieved allow us to explain the functioning of language not only at the sentence level, but beyond the sentence, and even to recognize its pragmatic impact. The explanation should not be ignored in the field of language teaching, hence our inquiries led to proposals for teaching grammar.