The Monk or the model of revolutionary rhetorics: a metamorphosis of evil

The attraction for terror, mystery and monsters has existed even since ancient times, asthe novels and Hellenistic tragedies, but also Elizabethan drama. However it is from thesecond half of the 18th century and especially towards the French Revolution, when the libertine novels appear in France, al...

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Detalles Bibliográficos
Autor principal: Videla Martínez, Julieta
Formato: Artículo revista
Lenguaje:Español
Publicado: Centro de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Filosofía y Humanidades 2020
Materias:
Acceso en línea:https://revistas.unc.edu.ar/index.php/recial/article/view/29424
Aporte de:R de Universidad Nacional de Córdoba Ver origen
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Sumario:The attraction for terror, mystery and monsters has existed even since ancient times, asthe novels and Hellenistic tragedies, but also Elizabethan drama. However it is from thesecond half of the 18th century and especially towards the French Revolution, when the libertine novels appear in France, also called romans noirs, and the gothic novels inEngland, called tales of terror as a response to the Enlightenment paradigm that takesmedieval materials redefining them in order to create new aesthetic forms. I aminterested here to study the metamorphoses of evil that revolutionary rhetoric, in thiscase, The Monk, operates as a gothic novel through the recovery and resemantization ofmedieval evil, according to which the latter reflect the sinister singularity of modernliterature .I will mainly take the concepts of monstrosity and evil and analyze themhermeneutically to interpret what the metamorphosis of these categories is like in thelate eighteenth century, with the event of the French Revolution in the aforementionedwork. In this work we brace The Monk as a model of the revolutionary rhetoric that willmark the aesthetic trend towards the 19th century thanks to his original commitmentthat is firstly to represent the metamorphosis of evil even using medieval materials, andsecondly, to attend to the place of receptors, caring about producing certain aestheticsthat arouse interest in a new sensibility.